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Parents: Talking to your teen Part 3

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Talking to your teenager about Sexuality & Sexual Health
A Guide for Parents & Caregivers Part 3: Teens and Birth Control
All teens who have sexual intercourse with a partner need to know how to prevent STIs and pregnancy
The male condom
A soft tube that fits over the erect penis. Used once and thrown away. Sold in stores, pharmacies and online. Most made of latex. For latex allergy users, polyurethane or silicone alternatives are available.
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What is it?
How does it work?
How well does it prevent pregnancy?
Creates a physical barrier that prevents bodily fluids from passing between partners. It reduces skin-to-skin contact between penis and vagina, anus and/or mouth. A new condom must be used for each act of sexual activity.
A male condom is 98% effective when used perfectly every time you have sex. With average use, it is 85% effective.
The female condom
A soft plastic tube that fits into the vagina. It is made of polyurethane. Used once and thrown away. Sold online and in some stores and pharmacies.
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What is it?
How does it work?
How well does it prevent pregnancy?
It is placed in the vagina before sexual intercourse. It lines the vagina and prevents direct contact between penis and vagina. A new condom must be used for each act of sexual activity.
The female condom is 95% effective when used perfectly every time you have sex. With average use, it is 79% effective.
What do they look like?
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Female (Internal) Condom
IUD (Mirena)
Male (External) Condom
The Ring (NuvaRing)
The Patch
Emergency Birth Control (Plan B)
Emergency contraception is also an important option to know about.
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What is it?
How does it work?
How well does it prevent pregnancy?
Two pills taken as soon as possible after having sex without any form of birth control. Sometimes called the morning after pill. Sold in pharmacies without a prescription.
Changes the mucus in a women's cervix so that it becomes "hostile" to sperm. Makes the lining of the uterus thinner so that a fertilized egg will not implant.
Up to 99% of women who take the correct number of pills at the right time will be able to avoid an unwanted pregnancy. If the woman does become pregnant, the pills will not harm the fetus or stop the pregnancy.
The pills MUST be taken within 3 days of having sex without birth control.
For more information see Talking to your Teenager about Sexuality & Sexual Health, Parts 1-2, 4-5 and our Conversation Tips:
Part 1: Growing Up Sexually Healthy & Let's Start Talking
Part 5: The Internet & Sex
Part 4: Alcohol & Other Drug Use
Part 2: Sexual Development & Sexual Health Risks
Conversation Tips
Eastern Health, 2016
Talking to Your Teenager about Sexuality, ages 13-18, Peel Public Health.
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