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KLEWS

published by Cindy Kern

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KLEWS
Student Understanding
Changing Over Time
KLEWS provides a scaffold to make explicit change in student understanding overtime. This scaffold helps student connect their change in understanding to evidence. KLEWS can be both a formative assessment. And KLEWS can be used in both whole group or small group settings.
Know, Learning, Evidence, Wonder, Scientific Principles
After presenting a phenomenon, students are given the opportunity to model, explain, etc. the phenomenon based on their prior knowledge. Students ideas are "revisited and revised as students develop more robust ways of thinking about phenomena."
Students are encouraged to look for patterns as they investigate the phenomenon. From the EVIDENCE they are asked to make claims to explain what is causing the phenomenon.
Students use EVIDENCE from investigating the phenomenon to make claims about what is happening or why the phenomenon is happening? What the students are learning is explicitly linked to the EVIDENCE.
Asking and answering questions is foundational in science. WONDERING should be encourage and recorded in the KLEWS chart. It is ok if students don't answer all their questions, the key is to keep them WONDERING!
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Students use sense-making, often through peer-to-peer discussion to understand what is happening with the phenomenon. Their scientific language becomes more sophisticated as their understanding of phenomena increases.
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What do we think we KNOW?
What are we LEARNING (claim)?
What is our EVIDENCE?
What do we WONDER about?
What scientific reasoning/sense-making will  help explain the phenomenon?
Alphabet Soup
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KLEWS is not a linear scaffold. It is recursive in nature just like learning!
Are students provided the opportunity to draw, write, talk about a phenomenon before they learn about it? Are students given the opportunity to revisit and revise their understanding based on experiences in class and evidence?
Are students given the opportunity to to use evidence to make a claim about the questions they (and the teacher) have about the phenomenon? Is student learning explicitly tied to EVIDENCE? Their observations? Patterns they have identified?
What experiences am I giving my students that allow them to collect evidence first hand? How am I helping them analyze their observations (patterns, cause and effect, etc)? How am I helping students connect EVIDENCE to their LEARNING?
Are students provided time and space to ask questions? Am I helping my students as questions? Are student questions recorded and made public? Do we answer student questions using evidence?
Am I too focused on vocabulary? Am I giving student time and space to understand the concept, not just the word? Do I have meaningful activities for students  expertise their sense-making skills used to understand the phenomenon?
KLEWS ~4~ Planning
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“In science, the experiments can be lots of fun and the students can kind of forget what they are supposed to learn." "Using the KLEWS chart helped to anchor the objectives for the lesson and give it a purpose.”
“Now, I start with a question, have them investigate, next we discuss what they observed so they can make a claim and support it with evidence. After that, I bring out a science book so we can clarify what we have learned. The students listen attentively to the science content when they can connect it to what they see during their investigations. Finally, they incorporate the science vocabulary in their notebook entries.”
"I like to start with a phenomenon and let the students come up with questions. So I start with Wonder. My students are given time & space to draw, write, or talk about what they think is going on with the phenomenon. Then we do an investigation and collect evidence. Followed by a discussion to make a claim based on the observations. The vocabulary and content are introduced throughout the lesson."
Modified from Hershberger & Zembal-Saul's Feb 2015 NSTA Science & Children "KLEWS to Explanation-Building in Science"