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History Monument Project - Mo and Kwass

published by Mo Liu

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WORDS, LEGACY, MEMORY. 
What We Can Learn From the Inscriptions on Civil War Monuments
Mo Liu 
&
Katherine Wass
T1: Double click to edit
In this infographic we examine the inscriptions on Civil War monuments from Maine and North Carolina. We break down the elements embedded in these inscriptions, and through analysis we demonstrate the differences between northern and southern sentiments regarding the Civil War in its following decades through graphics and compiled data. 
MAINE
What words are most frequently mentioned on Maine monuments?
SOME FACTS
Total Civil War Monuments: 144

Average Word Count per Monument*: 21.4 

Words Appear Most Frequently: 
1) Memory 2) War 3) Soldiers 4) Union 5) Country
*Note: In doing the word count we left out the dates, the organization/individual erected, and the names of individual dedicated to.
NORTH CAROLINA
SOME FACTS
Total Civil War Monuments: 81

Average Word Count per Monument: 48.4

Words Appear Most Frequently:
 1) Confederate 2) Country 3) Deo Vindice* 4) Soldiers 5) Memory

*"Deo Vindice" means in Latin With God As Our Defender. It was motto of the confederate states, inscribed on their seal. 
What words are most frequently mentioned on North Carolina monuments?
The Term Used to Reference the Civil War
MAINE
NORTH
CAROLINA
The Term Used to Reference the Civil War
Figure 1.
Figure 2.
WHAT DO WE SEE?
After eliminating the unnecessary elements of the monument inscriptions we calculated the average word count for both the North Carolina and the Maine monuments. The monuments in North Carolina have a larger average word count of 48.4 words while the monuments in Maine have an average word count of 21.4. By placing more text on the monuments the southern states worked to convey specific messages and worked to keep their pre civil war ideals alive.

 The conveying of certain messages can also be evaluated by looking at the words that are most frequently mentioned. The main difference between the words used most frequently in the Maine and NC monuments is between “confederate” and “union”, showing a large difference in the message being conveyed in the inscriptions. 

The charts visually reflect the different sentiments of the north and south during the war because they show what they each called the war and what they considered the war to be about. In the North, the war was continuously referred to as the “rebellion” which has a very different tone than the South, where the majority emphasized on preserving state rights.
SELECTED MONUMENTS FROM
MAINE
Thomaston
Inscription:
In Memory of The Soldiers and Sailors/One Country/One Flag

The phrase "One Flag" is mentioned in multiple other monuments. It represents the intention of the war fought on the North's behalf: to reunite the country.
Standish, Steep Falls Park
Inscription:
A Memorial to/All Soldiers And Sailors And Loyal Women/Who Served Gallantly

This monument is the only one partially dedicated to women, despite the fact that many monuments were erected by women organizations. 
Lewiston
Inscription:
We Lie Here In Obedience To The Spirit of Liberty/Justice Demanded The Sacrifice/We Willingly Offered It/In Our Death Is Freedom's Victory

This monument is one of the few that cites liberty and justice as the purpose of the war. The majority only mentions integrity of the union but not its moral significance. 
SELECTED MONUMENTS FROM
NORTH CAROLINA
Thomaston
Inscription:
Deo Vindice/When Can Their Glory Fade/O The Wild Charge/They Made All The World Wondered

“Deo Vindice” was frequently mentioned on the monuments, honoring the Confederate States.
Old Durham County Courthouse
Inscription:
The Boys Who Wore The Gray

Many of the monuments reference the uniform worn by the Confederate soldiers who wore gray. 
Albemarle
Inscription:
“The captains and the kings depart   Lord, God of Hosts, be with us yet   Lest we forget—lest we forget.”

“Lest we forget” is a very common phrase used on monuments and was first used in a poem by Rudyard Kipling. 
Work Cited:
http://www.maine.gov/civilwar/monuments.html

http://discerninghistory.com/2013/03/deo-vindice-motto-of-the-confederacy/

http://ncmonuments.ncdcr.gov/BBCounty.aspx