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Blogagility.com - SAFe® POPM Guide & Checklists

published by Marshall Guillory (blogagility)

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Special
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POPM GUIDE
2018
SAFe®
Hello Community! It's me, Al Gile. We are pleased to present our first SAFe® POPM Guide & checklists! Our sincere hope is that you find it valuable in your endeavor to provide the very best in product stewardship to your organization. Don't forget to give us feedback so that we can relentlessly improve!
Lead with love,
Al Gile @blogagility.com
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This aggregated work © 2018 BLOGAGILITY.COM & Marshall Guillory.
Content
SAFe® POPM Guide
How to use the checklists
Product Owner Checklist
Product Manager Checklist
Creating a shared vision and strategy that fits your business model and will support a realistic and predictable roadmap for the solution in the customer's context.
Start Here!
The Shared Vision
Inspiration
Have you prioritized and sequenced features into a realistic and predictable roadmap?

How are you going to measure success? Were any NFR's considered?

How much customer engagement has gone into producing the roadmap?
What is the purpose of the solution/product? Is there a positive impact expected? Does it align to the value stream(s)?
What is your strategy for achieving realistic, achievable, and  predictable results?
Does the solution fit the business context and the business model? Is there an ART with the necessary domain purpose?
Strategic Themes?
Do you know where to find the Strategic Themes for the enterprise and do you understand their intent?
Understanding your stakeholders
Have you mapped out the personas with an influencer matrix so you can visualize your relationships?

Have you created an action plan that you can commit to?

Do you have an improvement backlog for your role, the system, and the product?
Continuously exploring customer needs
Benefit Hypothesis
Build MMF
Collaborative Design
Evaluate
LEAN
UX
Figure above: Zuñiga, Rebeca. “The Lean Startup Methodology.” Flickr, Yahoo!, 25 July 2015, www.flickr.com/photos/rzuniga/20009912451.
Launch... 
Attend a SAFe® POPM 4.5 course from Big Lake Software!
Read  SAFe® Articles, Roman Pichler's blog and Reinertsen's Books
Simply follow the steps in each frequency category
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1
2
3
Ask Al Gile at Blogagility.com or join our community to enable continuous learning!
How to Use
PRODUCT OWNER
I AM
Daily Run
Time-box: ~an hour or two
Work Relationships.
The PO's world is the teams they are working with and then the product.  
Work on your relationships daily. Talk to PM's, stakeholders, customers, end users, and the team.
Tend to the garden. Find the weeds and pull them before they harm outcomes.
Colocate with the team(s) as often as possible.
Walk the Program Dependency Board and team(s) Kanbans daily.
Gain awareness of changes in business context, team building state, and the pulse of the ART. Help remove impediments.
Product Owner, "Operator" & "Champion" on Cadence
The Product Owner working within a SAFe® portfolio is by definition an operator, "a person or company that engages in or runs a business or enterprise." Operating in your slice of the product's scope to drive successful outcomes in product development measured by the value created. Connecting the business context to the solution and the teams.
The Product Owner working within a SAFe® portfolio is also the champion of the product. 

"The PO represents the interests of everyone with a stake in the resulting project...achieves initial ongoing funding by creating the initial requirements, ROI, objectives and release plans." - Schwaber 2007. 

As pointed out by Dean Leffingwell, "the product owner's responsibilities don't end with the previous broad statement."

There must be a dual role capability at scale in a large enterprise to dissolve the inherent conflict created by a member of the team driving requirements as the proxy to the customer (the PO). 
Figure above - “11-2.” Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, by Dean Leffingwell and Donald G. Reinertsen, Addison-Wesley, 2012.
Product Manager
Product Owner
Solution Facing
Market Facing
More Strategic
More Tactical
Consistently meets with team(s) to refine the Team Backlog as a content authority for stories and enablers.
Just in time story elaboration – keep the backlog healthy by developing the quality and context of stories as close as possible to the pull date; this ensures teams work healthy, valuable stories.
Sequence stories as often as possible against the current business context for the product; don't spend effort sequencing stories that are not well-formed and/or below the order line in a Kanban system.
Make yourself available to support the team(s) Iteration Planning ceremony.
Make yourself available to support the team(s) Review ceremony. Listen to the team during the demo. Accept or reject stories with sound reasoning and good communication within the definition of done.
Attend the Daily Scrum or Board Walk as an active listener until the ceremony is over. Speak during the meet after.
Attend the Iteration Retrospective with the team of teams as an active listener and engaged participant. Bring up your improvement stories for the product or the process.
Attend the Team Retrospective as an active listener until the Scrum master or Lean-Agile Leader requests your input. Bring up your improvement stories for the product or the process.
PO - Team
Level Activities
Receive/create story and product metrics:
Understand the context of, and acknowledge receipt of completed and not completed stories that were pulled into and/or created/changed during the iteration (re: iteration backlog).
Collect and measure data on the number of stories planned vs. completed to be used solely for improvement of planning accuracy, decomposition strategy, and sizing/estimation calibration.
Collect and measure data on the story differential; that is the number of new or significantly changed or waste stories in the iteration to be used solely for the improvement of planning accuracy, decomposition strategy, and sizing/estimation calibration.
Ensures Stories and Enablers meet the acceptance criteria.
Help decompose Features into Stories and Enablers and prioritizes the Team Backlog.
Works with the System Architect and the team to understand and prioritize Enablers.
Wholly support the technical practices of Extreme Programming(XP) and Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD).
Pichler, Roman. “THE PRODUCT OWNER’S CHECKLIST FOR THE FIRST SPRINT.” Roman Pichler, 2014, www.romanpichler.com/.
Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, by Dean Leffingwell and Donald G. Reinertsen, Addison-Wesley, 2012.
Stories are aligned with Vision, Features, Architectural Runway, and PI Objectives.
Has content authority for the Team Backlog.
Program 
Level Activities
System Demo - helps PM create, plan, prepare and coordinate product integration and system demo with other appropriate teams (ART and Systems Teams). May include presenting the System Demo to the ART and stakeholders depending on product slice you are responsible for.
Supports PM by reviewing and contributing to the program Vision, Roadmap, and content presentations.
PI System Demo (or Solution Demo in a Large Solution)- helps PM create, plan, prepare and coordinate final product integration for the PI system demo with other appropriate teams (ART and Systems Teams).
Backlog Item
Non-Functional Requirement
constrained by
Figure above - “17-1.” Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, by Dean Leffingwell and Donald G. Reinertsen, Addison-Wesley, 2012.
Support PM with Content Readiness and program backlog grooming. Usually occurs weekly and early in the IP iteration before the PI Planning event. Include the system architect and other stakeholders as appropriate.
Observe and act upon the prioritization influence of the features WSJF, technical and political prioritization when prioritizing the Team Backlog.
Supports PM with planning and organizing releases in coordination with configuration, release management, and Systems Team(s).
Work across teams to define and implement improvement stories that will increase the velocity and quality of the program(as part of I&A).
Metrics - report to PM the condition/quality and status of completeness to the definition of done for all features pulled by the team into the Team Backlog.
Prior to System Demo each iteration.
Less than 1 week prior to PI System Demo each program increment.
# of features planned vs. completed as pulled.
# of features changed from plan as pulled.
# of new features pulled and # of features removed.
Support the PM in the collection of and measurement of the feature differential; that is the number of new or significantly changed or waste features in the Program Increment to be used solely for the improvement of planning accuracy, decomposition strategy, and sizing/estimation calibration.
Finalize dependencies and enablers for the current PI; prepare future PI dependencies and enablers in preparation for PI Planning based on potentially viable features the team will pull.
Coordinate dependencies with other POs, Architects, and stakeholders in conjunction with the Lean-Agile Leader (or Scrum master). This often occurs in weekly PO Sync and/or ART Sync meetings.
General Things over time
PO
365
Represents customers and stakeholders as a good faith champion towards successful business outcomes.
Is open to negotiations that will occur with customers, stakeholders and the team. Will never push work onto the team, but instead negotiate a pull that the team can commit to.
Operates as part of an extended Product Management Team. Shares content authority for the program.
Understands how to operate with Epics, Capabilities, Features, and Stories as forms of expression of user needs.
Uses PI Objectives and Iteration Goals to communicate with the Enterprise Team, LPM, and business owners.
Coordinates with other Product Owners, the System Team, and Shared Services in the ART PI Planning meetings.
Works with other Product Owners and Product Management throughout each Iteration and PI.
Effective scope triage requires the constant evaluation of technical, functional, performance and user-value tradeoffs. Prioritizing refactors and defects vs. new value stories is a critical skill in Agile.
Understands builds and has awareness of trust in interactions with all stakeholders.
Identifies and decomposes cognitive biases, assumptions, validates feedback loops to root out the truth in product development.
Behaves as a gardener of the product and team backlogs; Recognize that the two are related but not the same.
Commits to working upward in the portfolio to support Product Managers but understands the focus is on the solution.
Commits to working outwards to the customer at the appropriate interface level including synchronizing with the PM.
Constantly maintains a sense of balance between the needs of the business and the capabilities and capacity of the team.
Works to enhance communication between themselves, the Agile Team, customers, and PM.
Continuously learns about the business domain to enhance communication and understanding of the product and how to define and prioritize work on the product.
Decentralize the Lean UX process to the team so that teams are empowered to collaborate with customers.
Help foster collaboration with the ART understanding the definition of ready without falling into the anti-pattern of a phase gate approach to loading the backlog (as warned by Mike Cohn).
Leffingwell, Dean. “Scaled Agile Framework – SAFe for Lean Enterprises.” Scaled Agile Framework, 2018, www.scaledagileframework.com/.
Cohn, Mike. “The Dangers of the Definition of Ready.” Mountain Goat Software, 2018, www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/.
You are a PART TIME product owner. Even worse, you are also a member of the development team.
“An anti-pattern is something that looks like a good idea, but which backfires badly when applied.” - Jim Coplien
PO
You are a product owner for three or more teams.
You are never available to the team. Or worse, you are only available "just barely enough". You are not really the product owner, you were assigned as a proxy to the real PO.
You introduce yourself to a visitor as the Product Owner and Scrum master for the team.
You introduce yourself to a visitor as the Product Owner and manager for the team. There are only three roles on a Lean-Agile/Scrum team. Product Owner, Lean-Agile Leader/Scrum master, and development team. Only a Scrum master/Lean-Agile Leader should be part-time on the development team.
You only refine the backlog once per iteration.
Features are sliced into "requirements gathering", "design", "build" and "test" stories.
Your "vision" for the product is derived only from customer input or only from the business. Product vision is a multi-faceted collaborative approach that is communicated with everyone.
Pursuing speed over successful business outcomes is not sustainable and will result in failures.
You have an inability to trust any person, process or technology. 
You ignore existing governance/compliance or even worse, the enterprise doesn't have them.
You tell a member of the development team, "Hey, we need to do your annual review next week." Because you are also a resource manager.
Your version of feature slicing involves copying and pasting lines from your MS Project WBS and/or requirements document.
You believe the "Three C's" and "INVEST" is about an A&E Wall Street crime drama. 
You insist that user stories are written with at least 100 words. You insist that the user stories are perfect.
You don't believe in the power of acceptance criteria. You also think that the "definition of done" is based on of when the developer says the code is done.
You only include your favorite or certain development team members in the backlog refinement process.
You clearly know everything.
Product  Manager
PRODUCT BUSINESS
S T A R T
IT/IS BUSINESS
S T A R T
"The Product Development and Management Association has published a body of knowledge, which suggests the responsibilities of those who perform the various functions of product management in a product-oriented company." 
For this checklist, we are going to use a blended approach in order to have some reasonable brevity and also still provide a valuable checklist for the "SAFe® Product Manager in the agile enterprise."
"The International Institute of Business Analysts (IIBA) has developed a Guide to the Business Analysts Body of Knowledge (BABOK) to guide practitioners who fulfill this role."
Essentially, there are two schools of thought on the titles/responsibilities of the role of a PM depending on the type of business... product manager/solution manager/program manager vs. business analyst.
Figure above - “Chapter 14. Pg. 275.” Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, by Dean Leffingwell and Donald G. Reinertsen, Addison-Wesley, 2012.
CONTENT
MANAGEMENT
PRODUCT MANAGER
I AM
Daily Run
Time-box: ~an hour or two
The PM's world is the enterprise and  customers they are working with and then the team of teams (ART).  
Work on your relationships daily. Talk to LPM's, RTE, stakeholders, customers, end users, and the team of teams.
Tend to the garden. Find the weeds and pull them before they harm outcomes.
Co-located with marketing/business as often as possible.
Walks the Program Dependency Board and Portfolio/Solution Kanbans daily.
Gain awareness of changes in business context, ART team building state, and the pulse of the ART. Help remove impediments.
Product Manager, "Business Analyst" & "Solution Manager" on Cadence
"Product Management has content authority for the Program Backlog. They are responsible for identifying Customer needs, prioritizing Features, guiding the work through the Program Kanban and developing the program Vision and Roadmap." - Scaled Agile Framework
The Product Manager working within a SAFe® portfolio is also the champion of the product. Dean's point stands here as well below.

"The PO represents the interests of everyone with a stake in the resulting project...achieves initial ongoing funding by creating the initial requirements, ROI, objectives and release plans." - Schwaber 2007. 

As pointed out by Dean Leffingwell, "the product owner's responsibilities don't end with the previous broad statement."

There must be a dual role capability at scale in a large enterprise to dissolve the inherent conflict created by a member of the team driving requirements as the proxy to the customer (the PO). This is accomplished through the Product Manager role separating duties from the PO.
 Content authority and Content Manager for the Program Backlog for a team of teams (ART).
Consistently meets with ART POPM's, LPM, stakeholders, and business owners to refine the Program Backlog as a content authority for features and enablers.
Just in time feature elaboration – keep the backlog healthy by developing the quality and context of features as close as possible to the pull date; this ensures teams work healthy, valuable features that are decomposed from Epics or Capabilities.
Roadmap features against the current business context for the product; don't spend effort sequencing features that are not well-formed or funded.
Make yourself available to support the ARTs PI Planning ceremony.
Make yourself available to support the ART's System Demo ceremony. Listen to the teams during the demo. Accept or reject features with sound reasoning and good communication within the definition of done.
Attend the Scrum of scrums, PO Sync or Board Walk as an active listener until the ceremony is over. Speak during the meet after.
Attend the PI Retrospective during I&A with the ART as an active listener and engaged participant. Bring up your improvement stories for the product or the process.
Attend the Iteration Retrospective as an active listener until the RTE requests your input. Bring up your improvement stories for the product or the process.
PM - ART
Level Activities
Receive/create feature and product metrics:
Understand the context of, and acknowledge receipt of completed and not completed features that were pulled into and/or created/changed during the iteration or program increment (re: program backlog).
Collect and measure data on the number of features planned vs. completed to be used solely for  improvement of planning accuracy, decomposition strategy, and sizing/estimation calibration.
Collect and measure data on the feature differential; that is the number of new or significantly changed or waste features in the iteration to be used solely for the improvement of planning accuracy, decomposition strategy, and sizing/estimation calibration.
Ensures Features and Enablers meet the acceptance criteria. Features are aligned with Strategic Themes, Vision, Epics/Capabilities, Architectural Runway, and PI Objectives. Has content authority for the Program Backlog.
Help decompose Epics/Capabilities into Features and Enablers and prioritizes the Program Backlog.
Works with the EA, Solution Architect, System Architect, and the team to understand and prioritize Enablers.
Wholly support the technical practices of Extreme Programming(XP) and Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD).
Leffingwell, Dean. “Scaled Agile Framework – SAFe for Lean Enterprises.” Scaled Agile Framework, 2018, www.scaledagileframework.com/.
Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, by Dean Leffingwell and Donald G. Reinertsen, Addison-Wesley, 2012.
Accepts the Features as done according to the definition of done.
Leading the POPM team as a servant leader.
Understand the architectural runway for the product and drive enablers and enabler development in support of a successful business outcome at iteration/PI boundaries, releases.
Understands that feature slicing, sizing and estimation is a multi-stage process (A<B<C<Planned<Actual)
Participate in PI Planning in support of feature prioritization, refinement, socialization, and decomposition into plans that the ART may commit to.
Support teams in the creation of SMART PI Objectives that are value driven.
Plans and facilitates Program Backlog Workshops (PBW) on a cadence in support of a healthy Program Backlog.
Portfolio  
Level Activities
System Demo - own, create, plan, prepare and coordinate product integration and system demo with the ART and other appropriate teams (Shared Services and Systems Teams). Present the System Demo to the ART and stakeholders depending on product slice you are responsible for.
Own, review and create the program Vision, Roadmap, and content presentations for PI Planning.
PI System Demo (or Solution Demo in a Large Solution)- own, create, plan, prepare and coordinate final product integration for the PI system demo with the ART and other appropriate teams (Shared Services and Systems Teams).
Backlog Item
Non-Functional Requirement
constrained by
Figure above - “17-1.” Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, by Dean Leffingwell and Donald G. Reinertsen, Addison-Wesley, 2012.
Own Content Readiness and program backlog grooming. Organize weekly and early in the IP iteration before the PI Planning event. Include EA/Solution Architect, system architect and other stakeholders as appropriate.
Observe and act upon the prioritization influence of the Epics/Capabilities WSJF, technical and political prioritization when prioritizing the Program Backlog.
Plan and organize releases in coordination with configuration, release management, and Systems Team(s).
Metrics - report to LPM the condition/quality and status of completeness to the definition of done for all epics, capabilities, features pulled by the ART into the Program Backlog.
Prior to System Demo each iteration.
Less than 1 week prior to PI System Demo each program increment.
# of features planned vs. completed as pulled.
# of features changed from plan as pulled.
# of new features pulled and # of features removed.
Measure the feature differential; that is the number of new or significantly changed or waste features in the Program Increment to be used solely for the improvement of planning accuracy, decomposition strategy, and sizing/estimation calibration.
Finalize dependencies and enablers for the current PI; prepare future PI dependencies and enablers in preparation for PI Planning based on potentially viable features the team will pull.
Coordinate dependencies with other POs, Architects, and stakeholders in conjunction with the Lean-Agile Leader (or Scrum master). This often occurs in weekly PO Sync and/or ART Sync meetings.
# of capabilities planned vs. completed as pulled.
feature progress chart.
# of enabler features planned vs. completed as pulled.
PI Burndown towards capacity planned in story points.
others: http://www.scaledagileframework.com/metrics/
Leffingwell, Dean. “Scaled Agile Framework – SAFe for Lean Enterprises.” Scaled Agile Framework, 2018, www.scaledagileframework.com/.
Prioritizes Features and negotiates Enablers in the  Program Backlog using WSJF, economic, technical, and political prioritization.
Sets [creates] the Vision and Roadmap for the train.
Collaborates with the train to set scope in accordance with the velocity of the ART.
Supports the LPM, BO, RTE in obtaining, maintaining sufficient data sources for verification of the additive relative estimating system used to perform capacity management and planning.
Involved in the planning and assessment of metrics, including evaluation of business value achieved versus plan, and are active participants in the inspect and adapt ceremonies.
Organizes dry-runs for releases (canary releases, feature toggles, dark releases).
Supports LPM and Solution Management in portfolio/solution management and flow of Epics and Capabilities through the portfolio Kanban.
Maintains an accurate and consistent Product Roadmap and Vision for the current and two future Program  Increments for feature development.
Understands and can communicate the hypothesis in the Lean Business Case for Epics.
Prioritizes fixed-date features and communicates dependencies to the ART(s) and stakeholders.
Plans and manages the product budget apportioned from the funded Value Stream in the Lean Budgets.
Reports on product Lean Budgets to LPM and the enterprise as required per policy.
Maps ART velocity and capacity to support capacity planning and management. 
Maintains the relative cost per story point for the ART in order to support portfolio capacity planning and management.
Meets with the customer to elicit requirements, ideas, knowledge/data, concerns, prioritization, problems, politics, et cetera in support of the enterprise, the value stream and successful business outcomes in the customer's solution context.
Owning, driving, and shepherding the ‘what’ for the product and the ART developing 'it' over program increments in accordance with the product roadmap and enterprise vision.
Works across teams to define and implement improvement features/stories that will increase the quality of business outcomes in the program (as part of I&A).
Represents customers and stakeholders as a good faith champion towards successful business outcomes.
Is open to negotiations that will occur with customers, stakeholders and the ART. Will never push work onto the ART, but instead negotiate a pull that the ART can commit to.
Operates as part of an extended LPM and Solution Management Team. Owns content authority for the program.
Understands how to operate with Epics, Capabilities, Features, and Stories as forms of expression of user needs.
Uses PI Objectives, Product Vision, and Strategic Themes to communicate with the Enterprise Team, LPM, RTE, and business owners.
Coordinates with other Product Owners, the System Team, and Shared Services in the ART PI Planning meetings.
Works with other Product Owners and Product Management throughout each Iteration and PI.
Effective scope triage requires the constant evaluation of technical, functional, performance and user-value tradeoffs. Prioritizing refactors and defects vs. new value features is a critical skill in Agile.
Understands builds and has awareness of trust in interactions with all stakeholders.
Identifies and decomposes cognitive biases, assumptions, validates feedback loops to root out the truth in product development.
Behaves as a gardener of the portfolio and program backlogs
Commits to working upward in the portfolio to support LPM and Solution Managers but understands the focus is on the solution.
Commits to working outwards to the customer at the appropriate interface level including synchronizing with the LPM and Solution Manager.
Constantly maintains a sense of balance between the needs of the business and the capabilities and capacity of the ART.
Works to enhance communication between themselves, the ART, Solution Manager, LPM, RTE, and customers.
Continuously learns about the business domain to enhance communication and understanding of the product and how to define and prioritize work on the product.
Decentralize the Lean UX process to the team so that the ART is empowered to collaborate with customers.
General
Things
PRODUCT MANAGER
Sometimes plays the role of Epic Owner for an epic. To drive and to shepherd.
Leffingwell, Dean. “Scaled Agile Framework – SAFe for Lean Enterprises.” Scaled Agile Framework, 2018, www.scaledagileframework.com/.
Deeply understands the customers’ business context and the solution intent.
Collaborates and sets expectations with Product Owners, stakeholders, customers, architects.
Can say ‘no’ in multiple directions: Stakeholders, Managers, LPM, and Product Owners.
Has significant people/soft, and leadership skills and the innate ability to navigate the political landscape by promoting truth, openness, and transparency.
Gains awareness of ART team building state and supports the RTE in removing impediments to ART team development.
Help foster collaboration with the ART understanding the definition of ready without falling into the anti-pattern of a phase gate approach to loading the backlog (as warned by Mike Cohn).
Cohn, Mike. “The Dangers of the Definition of Ready.” Mountain Goat Software, 2018, www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/.
You are a PART TIME product manager. Even worse, you are also a member of the LPM team.
“An anti-pattern is something that looks like a good idea, but which backfires badly when applied.” - Jim Coplien
PM
You are a product manager for five or more POs.
You are never available to the ART or your PO team. Or worse, you are only available "just barely enough". You are not really the product manager, you were assigned as a proxy to the real PM.
You introduce yourself to a visitor as the Product Manager and Resource Manager for the ART.
You don't organize the POPM resources for an ART as a lean-agile team.
You only refine the backlog once per iteration.
Epics/capabilities are sliced into "requirements gathering", "design", "build" and "test" features.
Your "vision" for the product is derived only from customer input or only from the business. Product vision is a multi-faceted collaborative approach that is communicated with everyone.
Pursuing speed over successful business outcomes is not sustainable and will result in failures.
You have an inability to trust any person, process or technology. 
You ignore existing governance/compliance or even worse, the enterprise doesn't have them.
You tell a member of the ART, "Hey, we need to do your annual review next week." Because you are also a resource manager.
Your version of Epic/Capability slicing involves copying and pasting lines from your MS Project WBS and/or requirements document.
You believe that when the agile coach mentions SMART PI Objectives they were talking about you. 
You insist that features are written with at least 100 words. You insist that all features must be perfect.
You don't believe in the power of acceptance criteria. You also think that the "definition of done" is based on of when the developer says the code is done.
You only include your favorite or certain POs and stakeholders in the backlog refinement process.
You clearly know everything.
You believe the Lean Business Case, Lean Startup Cycle, and Lean UX are just bad agile jokes.
You ignore WSJF prioritization in favor of only political prioritization. Because, its the optics that matter.
What’s Coming Next? 
SAFe® Scrum master Checklist
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This aggregated work © 2018 BLOGAGILITY.COM & Marshall Guillory.
v 1.0 Release, 16 MAR 2018