public

Loading...

TRI - Final Evaluation Report 2017 Positive Peace Mexico

published by Summer Lewis

Want to create a visual like this?

Get Started
FINAL EVALUATION REPORT
First National Encounter:
A Stronger Mexico: Pillars of Positive Peace 
Puebla, Mexico 
May 2017
Monitoring and Evaluation by:
True Roots International
www.truerootsinternational.org
Table of Contents
Introduction: A Letter from True Roots International
1
I. About the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop
3
II. Sociodemographic Breakdown of Workshop Participants
4
III. Enhanced Understanding of Core Workshop Topics 
5
IV. Outcomes and Impact Indicators
6
V. Stories of Impact
11
VI. Participant Feedback
17
VII. Suggestions for Future Events
18
Appendix 1: Measuring the Impact 
19
truerootsinternational.org
Appendix 2: Institutional Allies 
22
Introduction: A Letter from True Roots International
1
Key Observations & Findings
Based on our M&E work, True Roots International feels that overall, the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop project achieved its goals and objectives:
  • After the Workshop, across all metrics, participants demonstrated a significant increase in their level of understanding of and familiarity with core topics (knowledge and skills) from the Workshop (Objective 1).
  • Almost a year after the Workshop, a core group of participants are applying the knowledge and skills  gained at the Workshop (Objectives 1 and 2).
  • Thanks to the 2017 Workshop, these active young leaders have created new projects, enriched new and existing projects, and developed collaboration networks, as well as strengthening existing ones (Objectives 2 and 3).
truerootsinternational.org
  • The 2017 Workshop participants that continue to be active and engaged are the changemakers that Mexico needs in order to build peace from the ground up. 
  • These peacebuilders need further support and resources to deepen knowledge, skills, and networks to make change within the Mexican system. 
  • These active participants can serve as mentors and guides for other changemakers - new trainees -introducing them to the Positive Peace framework and forging even stronger alliances. 
WHAT IS MONITORING AND EVALUATION (M&E) AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? 
Monitoring and evaluation (or “M&E”) is a key component and process in any project or program. M&E is also known as “impact evaluation” - because it does just that: document, evaluate, and demonstrate the impact of a project. For this reason, The Rotary Foundation requires M&E for Global Grants – to systematically document and demonstrate the impact of the work Rotary and Rotarians are doing around the world.

M&E takes place over a specific period of time and measures the immediate results of a project (“outputs”) and deeper changes that take place over time (“outcomes” and “impact”). This information allows project stakeholders - including funders, organizers, and participants - to better understand:




HOW WAS M&E DONE FOR THE POSITIVE PEACE WORKSHOP? 
True Roots International (TRI), a nonprofit consulting organization directed by a Rotary Peace Fellow with relevant experience in peace and conflict resolution, was selected to coordinate the M&E of the Rotary Global Grant GG-1747287 "First National Encounter - A Stronger Mexico: Pillars of Positive Peace." (To see a detailed timeline and description of M&E activities carried out by True Roots International, see "Appendix 1: Measuring the Impact").

WHAT IS IN THIS REPORT?
This report summarizes findings of True Roots International’s M&E work from April 2017 - April 2018, providing funders and organizers with data and information - evidence - of the short-term results and longer-term impact of the Workshop within the time period of TRI’s M&E scope of work. 

KEY TAKEAWAYS & RECOMMENDATIONS
True Roots International was closely involved in the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop planning and M&E, granting us a unique perspective on the whole project and process. As such, there are a number of general, overarching observations and recommendations we wish to share with readers of this report.
  • If the project is achieving/achieved its goals and objectives
  • What sort of impact the project had on participants and if there were deeper changes
  • To assess how the project can be adjusted to enhance impact in the future
True Roots International believes that project funders and organizers can feel confident there is a clear project ROI (Return on Investment), and there is strong justification for future activities to strengthen previous participants’ knowledge, skills, and connections, as well as to train new participants:
  • Consider dedicating greater attention and resources to a small, select participant pool. This would allow for more extensive, personalized tracking of impact (M&E) for project participants.
  • Employ a rigorous selection process to bring together young leaders that are involved and active, will complement each other’s work, and will generate strong connections, networks, and support systems after the activity. 
  • Shift from a goal of “products” and tangible outputs (e.g. numbers, new projects and new collaboration networks) to focus on participant actions as outcomes (e.g. strengthening existing projects and networks and the quality of participant work).
  • Provide tools, structures, and platforms for participants to connect with each other, with practitioners, with likeminded organizations, and with resources (e.g. funding sources).   
Nicola Coakley
Monitoring and Evaluation Manager, True Roots International
Sincerely,
Summer Lewis
Director, True Roots International 
Rotary Peace Fellow 
&
In conclusion, it is our goal at True Roots International that through this report, we provide information on the practical and measurable impact of the 2017 Positive Peace Workshop for funders, organizers, and participants. The process of measuring the impact of this Workshop, however, need not end with this Final Evaluation Report. It is our hope that the data and information in this report serve as a foundation or “baseline” for future Workshops and related activities - to continue measuring the impact or long-term “ripple effects” of these efforts. True Roots wishes to acknowledge Encounter allies and supporters who made this event possible (please see Appendix 2, page 22). Thank you to the funders, organizers, and participants for the opportunity to contribute to this effort, and for the time and energy you have invested towards this collective process of change in Mexico.
2
Recommendations for Future Activities
Accompanying this strong recommendation to continue building the capacity of young leaders, True Roots International proposes the following for future Positive Peace activities: 
truerootsinternational.org
I. ABOUT THE MEXICO POSITIVE PEACE WORKSHOP
The strategic partnership between 
the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) and Rotary International focuses on the framework of Positive Peace, integrating IEP’s empirical research on the attitudes, institutions, and structures that contribute to more peaceful societies with Rotary’s grassroots work in communities around the globe. 
ROTARY - IEP 
PARTNERSHIP
STRUCTURE OF THE WORKSHOP
2-day intensive training with plenary sessions and workshops focused on the theoretical background and practical application of the Pillars of Positive Peace. Speakers and facilitators of the event included Rotarians, Rotary Peace Fellows, academics, and members of civil society organizations.
CREATION OF 
POSITIVE PEACE WORKSHOPS
One component of the strategic partnership between IEP and Rotary is the creation of Positive Peace Workshops in focal countries
The goal of these Positive Peace Workshops is to bring together groups of community leaders and peacebuilders to examine the practical, impactful, and measurable investments that can be made in communities to strengthen the Pillars of Positive Peace.
WHY MEXICO?
THE CONTEXT
High levels of organized crime trouble Mexico, ranking 144 out of 162 countries in IEP’s 2016 Global Peace Index. At the same time, its potential
for peace (as measured by IEP’s empirical analysis) is the second highest in the world. In Mexico, there is great promise for a more peaceful future.
With its 10,000 members and 
600 clubs in Mexico, Rotary makes 
a natural partner for promoting a positive vision of what Mexico can 
do to become more peaceful and prosperous in the years ahead.
OBJECTIVES OF THE WORKSHOP
The First National Positive Peace Workshop in Puebla, a pilot workshop, provided strategic training for young leaders and peacebuilders, with the goal of strengthening Positive Peace leadership in Mexico. The Workshop objectives were to:
Equip young leaders with tools and skills in peacebuilding and conflict resolution, based on the conceptual framework of Positive Peace.
Facilitate the formation of collaboration networks for participants, forging alliances that are essential to building peace in Mexico.
Motivate young leaders to apply these tools and skills to change their communities, cities, and country through participation in active, peace-related social initiatives.
1
2
3
[CLICK HERE] to view Participant Positive Peace Mapping Activity Video
3
truerootsinternational.org
II. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS
83% CURRENTLY INVOLVED IN 1+ SOCIAL IMPACT PROJECT
The majority of respondents (83%) were involved in one or more social impact project(s) in a variety of program areas.  
AGE BREAKDOWN
GENDER
BREAKDOWN
STATES OF RESIDENCE
19-21
 22-25
26-29
30+
INVOLVEMENT IN SOCIAL IMPACT  PROJECTS
COLLABORATION NETWORKS
The participants are involved in projects in a diverse set of fields, including: peace and conflict resolution, youth leadership, education and literacy, community and economic development, gender and inclusion, environment, and food security.  
of the participants are involved in one or more project(s) as a volunteer
76%
84%
of participants identified themselves as involved in their community (where they currently live, work, and / or study).
ORGANIZATIONAL AFFILIATION
As demonstrated in the graphic, half of the  Workshop participants were members of Rotaract, and the other half had a different background.
of  respondents were
currently involved in one or
56%
more collaboration network at a local, regional, national and / or international level before attending the Workshop.
304
committed young Mexican men and women from across 21 Mexican states were selected to participate in the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop. Participants included Rotaract members, youth leaders, students, and members of nonprofit and civil society organizations. Participant sociodemographic data presented here is based on the results of the Pre-Training Participant Survey.
*Rotary Club members were not funded by the grant
4
truerootsinternational.org
III. ENHANCED UNDERSTANDING OF CORE WORKSHOP TOPICS 
Participants evaluated their level of familiarity with core topics to be covered in the Positive Peace Workshop before the Workshop (in the Pre-Training Survey) and after the Workshop (in the Post-Training Survey). The change in participant levels of familiarity with core topics after the Workshop, as compared with before, is outlined below.
KNOWLEDGE METRICS
CONFLICT RESOLUTION
15 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very comfortable" with conflict resolution (as a skill) after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
POSITIVE PEACE
55 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very familiar" with the topic of Positive Peace after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 8%
63%
CONFLICT RESOLUTION
22 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very familiar" with the topic of conflict resolution after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 29%
51%
PEACEBUILDING
38 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very familiar" with the topic of peacebuilding after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 16%
54%
SOCIAL IMPACT
28 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very familiar" with the topic of social impact after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 42%
70%
SKILLS METRICS
 19%
34%
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
17 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very comfortable" with project management after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 19%
36%
Section III evaluates the extent to which Workshop Objective 1 was achieved: to equip young leaders with tools and skills in peacebuilding and conflict resolution, based on the conceptual framework of Positive Peace. Across all metrics, TRI saw that participants had an increased level of familiarity with core topics after the Workshop, as compared with before. We can also see that participants had the most substantial increase in understanding of the topics "Positive Peace" and "Peacebuilding."
PROJECT FUNDRAISING
21 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very familiar" with project fundraising after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 8%
29%
LEADERSHIP
22 percentage point increase in participants who felt "very comfortable" with leadership after the Workshop, as compared to before. 
 42%
64%
IMPACT
5
truerootsinternational.org
IV. OUTCOMES & IMPACT INDICATORS
The findings of the data from the Participant Pre-Training Survey and the Participant Post-Training Survey, outlined in the previous section, demonstrate the Workshop's mid-term impact: the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. 
PERTINENCE OF KNOWLEDGE
ACQUIRED AT THE WORKSHOP
100%
of respondents reported that the knowledge they acquired or reinforced at the Workshop was pertinent (52% "very pertinent," 48% "pertinent") to their work, studies, and / or projects.
APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE
 ACQUIRED AT THE WORKSHOP
Respondents to the Final Participant Survey reported whether they had since applied knowledge (related to the following core topics) acquired at the Workshop. Respondents also outlined in greater detail how they have been able to apply this knowledge - participant testimonials are included below. 

Note: these are the same knowledge metrics as listed in the previous section, but are organized here by level of applicability for participants (from most applicable to least applicable).
PARTICIPANT TESTIMONIALS
"What I learned about Conflict Resolution has served me in two aspects with my work. In one aspect, it equips me to work supporting populations living in violent situations, and in another, it helps me to resolve problems amongst the team at my organization."
"In the classroom, I have presented what I learned about the Pillars of Positive Peace as a new paradigm to study international relations."
"Based on what I learned about Social Impact, I seek to enhance the projects I undertake by providing tools that focus on the sustainability of the projects." 
POSITIVE PEACE
SOCIAL IMPACT
CONFLICT RESOLUTION
PEACEBUILDING
65%
of respondents have applied acquired knowledge on this subject to their work, studies, and / or projects since the Workshop 
62%
57%
51%
The Final Participant Survey was designed to capture data on the longer-term impact of the Positive Peace Workshop. It assessed, for example, whether: knowledge and skills have been applied, collaboration networks were created and are active, content has been shared, etc. Findings from the Final Participant Survey, in comparison with the findings of the previous two surveys, are outlined in this section.  
6
truerootsinternational.org
APPLICATION OF SKILLS ACQUIRED AT THE WORKSHOP
Respondents to the Final Participant Survey reported whether they had since applied the following skills acquired at the Workshop. Respondents then outlined in greater detail how they had applied these skills to their current work, studies, and / or projects - their testimonials are included below. 

Note: these are the same skills metrics as listed in the previous section, but are organized here by level of applicability for participants (from most to least).
PARTICIPANT TESTIMONIALS
"In terms of Project Management, I learned to create a solid structure for whatever type of project, one that makes the project viable and replicable, with results that create a real social impact."
"Just after returning from the Workshop, when I was feeling motivated to contribute the new knowledge and skills I had acquired, a leadership opportunity presented itself. I ran to be vice-president of my Rotaract Club and since starting the position, I have been able to contribute the Leadership and Project Management skills I reinforced at the Workshop." 
PERTINENCE OF
 SKILLS ACQUIRED AT THE WORKSHOP
96%
of respondents reported that the skills they acquired or reinforced at the Workshop were pertinent (65% "very pertinent," 31% "pertinent") to their work, studies, 
and / or projects.
The analysis in the previous subsections examines in greater depth whether Workshop Objective 1 was achieved: to equip young leaders with tools and skills in peacebuilding and conflict resolution. TRI also assesses here the achievement of Workshop Objective 2: to motivate young leaders to apply these tools and skills to their projects and initiatives. 
IMPACT
The above data shows us that core topics in the "Knowledge" category were relevant to all participants (100%) and topics in the "Skills" category were relevant to nearly all participants (96%). Looking deeper, TRI examined which knowledge topics and skills participants had actually put into action in their projects and what this application has looked like for participants at school, work, and / or in their projects. 
The topics are organized in the charts from most applicable to least applicable to demonstrate which knowledge and skills metrics best equipped participants for their work / studies. These rankings are likely due both to the relevance of certain skills and topics as well as how well they were presented at the Workshop.
LEADERSHIP
CONFLICT RESOLUTION
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
PROJECT FUNDRAISING
75%
57%
46%
25%
of respondents have applied this skill in their work, studies, and / or projects since the Workshop 
7
truerootsinternational.org
INCREASED
INVOLVEMENT IN
PROJECTS
& INITIATIVES
After the Positive Peace Workshop, 77% of Final Participant Survey respondents became involved in 1 or more new project(s) and / or initiative(s), that they weren't involved in before the Workshop.
Of those participants who became involved in a new project after the Positive Peace Workshop,
82% started the new project themselves.
100% 
of those participants who started new 
projects after the Positive Peace Workshop
reported that
participation in the Workshop motivated them to start the new project.
100% 
of those participants who have become involved in a new social project 
have applied knowledge and / or skills learned at the Positive Peace Workshop in the project. 
INVOLVEMENT IN
 1+ NEW PROJECT(S) SINCE THE WORKSHOP
YES
77% 
NO
  23% 
Workshop Objective 2 focused on creating change in communities by motivating participants to apply newly-learned tools and skills in local peace-related projects and initiatives. 
IMPACT
TRI assessed whether participants became newly involved in social project(s) after the Workshop, which most respondents did (77%). The results show that all respondents who had created a new project were, in fact, motivated by the Workshop to do so and had already applied knowledge / skills from the Workshop in the new initiative. 
8
truerootsinternational.org
PARTICIPATION IN COLLABORATION NETWORKS
The Final Participant Survey examined whether communication / collaboration networks had been created at the Positive Peace Workshop, if these networks were still active, which platforms were used, and how useful networks are to Workshop participants. The findings of this survey are outlined in this section.
NEW CONNECTIONS & NETWORKS CREATED AT THE WORKSHOP
73%
of respondents created one or more new connection(s) and / or collaboration
network(s) during the Positive Peace Workshop with other participants, facilitators, and / or organizers of the workshop.
Based on data from the Pre-Training Survey,
of participants were involved in one or more collaboration network(s) at a local, 
56%
regional, national and / or international level before attending the Workshop.
of participants use this platform 
to maintain communication with the collaboration networks created at the Workshop
PLATFORMS FOR COMMUNICATION & COLLABORATION
84%
47%
47%
89%
of participants who created new connections and / or networks with participants, organizers, and / or facilitators at the Positive Peace Workshop,
are still active in these new collaboration networks.
100%
of participants reported that it is useful to be a part of these new collaboration networks created at the Positive Peace Workshop. 79% ranked it as "very useful" and 21% as "useful."
of respondents reported that they had not created collaboration networks at the Workshop. 
27%
of these respondents reported that they
However, 86% 
to be a part of a collaboration network with Workshop participants, organizers, and facilitators.
would consider it useful
E-mail
Facebook
Whatsapp
(internet text messaging)
Workshop Objective 3 centered on forging alliances essential to peacebuilding in Mexico by facilitating the formation of collaboration networks between Workshop participants, facilitators, and / or organizers. To an extent, this objective was successfully met given that most respondents (77%) did create one or more collaboration network as a result of the Workshop. Those participants who did not create a new collaboration network overwhelmingly (86%) reported that being part of such a network would be useful to them. This data suggests that improved facilitation of collaboration networks at future events would lead to even more successful network-building. In this context, working in Mexico with young leaders, the data suggests that Facebook is the best platform to maintain this kind of collaboration network. 
IMPACT
9
truerootsinternational.org
SHARING OF CONCEPTS THEMES
& SKILLS
of respondents have shared information (themes, knowledge, skills) learned at the Workshop with others.
85%
Since the Positive Peace Workshop, 
Participants have shared information learned at the Positive Peace Workshop in the following contexts:
91%
of respondents who had shared information from the Positive Peace Workshop reported that they felt comfortable explaining the topics to others.
This subsection speaks to the reach or "indirect" impact of the Workshop by outlining how participants have shared Workshop content, tools, and skills and spread the framework of the Pillars of Positive Peace. The data above (from the Final Participant Survey) demonstrates overwhelmingly positive results. 
IMPACT
Most respondents (85%) had already taken the opportunity to share concepts from the Workshop across a variety of contexts, and most (91%) felt comfortable explaining these concepts to others. The most frequent contexts in which participants shared Workshop content were in personal projects, at work, and during another workshop.
Given the rate at which respondents had already shared Workshop information, TRI sees huge potential for the total (and ongoing) reach of Workshop content, tools, and skills. The reach could be as high as 16,538 people.
MULTIPLIER EFFECT
If all Workshop participants (304 total) share information from the Workshop at the same rate (85% share information), with the same number of other people (64 on average), 
the indirect impact (the reach of Workshop content) could be as high as 
16,538 people.
10
Each respondent to the Final Survey who had shared information learned at the Positive Peace Workshop had
the information with
64
on average. 
already shared
other people,
truerootsinternational.org
V. STORIES OF IMPACT
Beyond measuring impact indicators, the Final Participant Survey also captured individual stories of impact from participants. The goal of collecting these more detailed accounts is to understand to a greater depth how Workshop participants are applying what they learned and the skills they gained in practical, measurable ways. The following is a sampling of many stories submitted by participants to TRI. These stories demonstrate the concrete ways in which Workshop participants are fulfilling Workshop objectives, making change and promoting Positive Peace within their spheres - and beyond.
Bryan Fermin Molina Gatica
Rotaract District 4185 - Puebla, Puebla
After the Positive Peace Workshop , Bryan sought out several opportunities to share the information and training he acquired:
  • He participated in the Guerrero State Youth Parliament and took to the podium to share his stance on gender equalitya component of the Pillar of Positive Peace Acceptance of the Rights of Others.
  • Bryan organized a debate about good governance at La Universidad Americana de Acapulco with students across different disciplines.
  • In Puebla, Bryan participated in Datatón, a transparency and open data forum, where he applied knowledge on good governance learned at the Positive Peace Workshop.
Bryan applied for and received grant funding to develop a Public Speaking and Political Debate Club at his university that will engage high-school age students in discussions about public issues. Several high school groups from this initiative will go on to participate in a competition at the headquarters of the Honorable Congress of Guerrero. Bryan explains:
"The objective of this initiative is to bring young people together to share ideas and initiatives to solve conflicts by means of Positive Peace."
11
truerootsinternational.org
Rotaract District 4185 - Veracruz, Veracruz
Valeria Uscanga
Impassioned by her experience at the Workshop, Valeria collaborated with friends and young leaders to create a project called Urbano Mx with origins in Veracruz and now based in Puebla, Mexico.
Urbano Mx runs “Awareness Workshops” with high-school students, encouraging their participation as active citizens to identify social issues and generate ideas to improve conditions
They also  helped to organize the Changemaker Day at Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education,  Guadalajara and taught a workshop at the event.
Rotaract District 4110 - Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua
Andrés Nájera Martinez
"Since the Positive Peace Workshop, my projects have taken a different direction, one that is more focused on sustainability."
Andrés explains that at the Workshop, he broadened his understanding of social impact and the concept of sustainability in social impact projects. Andres noted that rather than simply carrying out social impact activities, he started to think more profoundly about the correct methodology to effectively plan for and create change. 
This change in Andrés' mindset prompted a change in the activities of his local Rotaract club at local orphanages and shelters. 
Valeria and her team provide guidance on the sustainability, replicability, and practicality of ideas and projects. 
AWARDS & RECOGNITION
"Urbano Mx was developed due to the passion of four friends to improve socially-minded initiatives and promote a culture of social responsibility and participatory citizenship among young people."
Valeria and the Urbano Mx team
Social Lab international call for projects and won 3rd place out of over 2,000 projects. 
participated in the
[CLICK HERE] to view a video about Valeria's project, Urbano Mx
12
truerootsinternational.org
Rotaract District 4140 - Uruapan, Michoacán
Alfredo Cano Bravo
Motivated by his experience at the Positive Peace Workshop, Alfredo and his friends decided to develop a new radio broadcasting project in his city of Uruapan to promote Positive Peace in the face of fear and insecurity. The project brings together local radio hosts, universities, high schools, and socially responsible businesses and reaches approximately
"For me, the most important change was this: to understand that creating peace does not only depend on reducing negative peace indicators. We can start at 0 and ignite a wave of positive change with new methods and citizen participation."
Alfredo noted that his experience at the Positive Peace Workshop sparked new interests and reinforced his leadership skills, empowering him to develop a new project in his city of Uruapan. 
The Context:
Alfredo notes that the city of Uruapan has, in recent years, suffered a wave of violence and insecurity. He quotes:
"Citizens remain living with anxiety. They live with the mindset of not
  wanting to walk the streets at night, to not carry any items of value, for  
  fear of suffering some kind of assault."
The Project:
10,000 people in Uruapan. 
University Student, UDLAP - Puebla, Puebla
Ingrid Valdez Luna
She also promotes this social education approach through her contribution to a project teaching mindfulness to primary school students and teachers.
Ingrid’s experience in these workshops motivated her thesis selection "Social and Emotional Educational programming in International Organizations: Generating a Culture of Peace."
Ingrid Valdez Luna was motivated by her experience at the Positive Peace Workshop to develop a social education approach to promote Positive Peace
After the Positive Peace Workshop, Ingrid attended and spoke at another peace conference:
Ingrid shared the principles of Positive Peace with more than 100 attendees of the "Education for Peace" conference organized by the Non-Violence Project and the Museum of Remembrance and Tolerance in Mexico City.
13
truerootsinternational.org
Fundación GC1- Culiacán, Sinaloa
Javier Llausas-Magaña 
In his current work, Javier Llausas-Magaña works in Management and Coordination of Social Projects for the Fundación GC1 in Culiacán, Sinaloa. The goal of the Fundación GC1 is to improve the quality of life in Culiacán and make it one of the most peaceful cities in Mexico. Javier’s program work with GC1 promotes: 
Peacebuilding  |  Education  |  Entrepreneurial Development
Democracy  |  Security 
The Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) invited Javier to participate in the Positive Peace Workshop because of his experience in the field working on the IEP Mexico Peace Index.
Regarding planning the “Education for Building Positive Peace in Sinaloa" Workshop, 
Javier explains:
“It is not simple to work with young people but the Positive Peace 
  Workshop in Puebla gave us the foundation, the educational 
  materials, the experience, and the confidence to recreate the idea.”
The Workshop took place in November 2017 with 190 young leaders from Sinaloa who came from a diverse set of backgrounds, including Rotaract. 
Motivated by his experience during the Positive Peace Workshop, Javier had the idea to replicate the Positive Peace training event in his state of Sinaloa. He developed and coordinated the:
“Education for Building Positive Peace in Sinaloa”
Workshop
REPLICATING THE POSITIVE PEACE WORKSHOP
14
truerootsinternational.org
The “Education for Building Positive Peace in Sinaloa” Workshop brought together the Rotary and Rotaract Clubs of Culiacán to learn how to build peace and “see that peace is not something abstract or difficult to understand.” 
“At first, the young leaders who attended the Workshop did not know how to define peace, nor how to begin to build peace in their communities. By the end of the Workshop, equipped with the framework of Positive Peace, they realized that if they resolved to build peace in any municipality in Mexico, they could do so with the methodology of the 8 Pillars of Positive Peace, by creating a plan and following the indicators.” 
Javier Llausas-Magaña describes the Workshop:
15
truerootsinternational.org
Yesenia Uribe Rochel
Rotaract District 4110 - Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua
Upon returning to Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Yesenia shared the tools she had learned with her local Rotaract and Rotary Clubs, with the goal that they could work in sync to create projects that promote peace in their community.
"I must say that before attending the Workshop, I didn't think that I had anything to contribute in terms of peace and conflict resolution. Participating in the Workshop changed my outlook and I realized the potential I had in my hands."
They have since implemented elements of Positive Peace into their initiative to rescue and rejuvenate local public spaces. In each revived public space, they paint murals related to the themes of Positive Peace.
[CLICK HERE] to view a video of Yesenia's project
16
truerootsinternational.org
This section and the next "VII. Suggestions for Future Events" are an annex of information shared in the Key Findings Report, based on analysis of the findings of the Post-Training Participant Survey (48% response rate). 
PARTICIPANT
 EXPERIENCE
ACADEMIC 
STRUCTURE
LOGISTICS
96% of respondents were satisfied with their overall experience.
92% of respondents were satisfied 
with the academic structure of the event.
88% of respondents were satisfied 
with the event logistics.
WORKSHOPS
Participant reflections on the intensive Pillars of Positive Peace workshops included strong positive feedback on workshop facilitators' knowledge, passion, and command of the topics covered. Many participants commented that they were energized by the opportunity to collaborate and network with a diverse group of likeminded peers. 
"The facilitators were experts in the themes and the activities carried out were dynamic."
PLENARY
SESSIONS
81% of respondents were satisfied with the plenary sessions provided by speakers at the event.
Reflecting on the plenary sessions, participants were impressed with the high caliber of the speakers and the energy with which they shared their insights and experiences. Many participants found the themes covered to be relevant, and the manner in which they were presented practical and motivating.
"Above all, I appreciated the opportunity to create close ties, friendships, and strategic alliances."
"It fills me with hope to know that across the country, there are others concerned with promoting peace."
Participant feedback:
"The empathy and passion with which the panelists expressed themselves"
"The opportunity to listen to panelists so highly trained in the study of peace" 
"The motivation demonstrated by the panelists which inspires us to keep working on our projects"
LOGISTICS
Participants offered praise in their evaluations for event organizers and hosts, recognizing the amount of work that went into coordination and their personalized attention during the event.   
"I appreciated the level of organization and the courtesy and attention 
shown by event hosts." 
"This is the best event I have attended in terms of structure... the high-quality content was really impressive."
"Event logistics were 
well-planned; as participants, we had nothing to worry about 
and could totally focus our attention on activities."
VI. PARTICIPANT FEEDBACK
Participant feedback:
Participant feedback:
Highly satisfactory
Somewhat satisfactory
Neutral
Somewhat unsatisfactory
Highly unsatisfactory
17
truerootsinternational.org
Based on Participant Evaluations
HOW TO IMPROVE THE WORKSHOP COMPONENT
More dynamic, participatory activities
CONTENT
LOGISTICS
Topics more clearly aligned with Positive Peace
Clearly outlined objectives
Allow for evaluation at the end of the workshop component
Provide larger spaces for workshops and / or smaller groups
Allow more time for the workshop component (less for plenary sessions)
Share profiles of workshop facilitators before the event
Allow more time for interaction among participants and Q&A
HOW TO IMPROVE THE PLENARY SESSIONS
Young entrepreneurs speak at the event
CONTENT
LOGISTICS
Components about the environment and creating sustainable projects
How to create inclusive community projects
Access to Rotary funding for non-Rotarians; access to other sources of funding
Share speakers' presentations / materials with participants
Allow for longer breaks between sessions
More engaging activities and site visits
INTEREST IN FUTURE EVENTS
IDEAS FOR
 FUTURE
 EVENT TOPICS
  INTEREST IN FUTURE EVENTS
Further exploration of the Pillars of Positive Peace
Leadership
Violence prevention
Project management
Human rights
Creating sustainable projects
The environment
Fundraising
are interested in regional workshops 
are interested in 
online courses / workshops
are interested in webinars
Allow more time for Q&A
97%
Of the participants who responded to the Post-Training Participant Survey:
99%
97%
VII. SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE EVENTS
18
truerootsinternational.org
APPENDIX 1:
MEASURING THE IMPACT
The goal of the Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) component of the "First National Encounter - A Stronger Mexico: Pillars of Positive Peace" is to document and demonstrate the impact of the project and test whether its goals and objectives were achieved. This report summarizes quantitative and qualitative findings of the M&E study, demonstrating beyond output numbers, the impact of the Positive Peace Workshop.
LONGER-TERM
IMPACT
Levels of community engagement of youth leaders 
Achievements of youth leaders at local, regional, national, and           international level 
Dissemination of content from the Positive Peace Workshop
OUTLINE INTENDED OUTCOMES OF THE WORKSHOP
The first step of the M&E study was to clearly outline the intended outcomes of the Workshop as established by the organizers.
1
2
3
CREATE LOGICAL FRAMEWORK
The logical framework establishes a roadmap for the monitoring and evaluation methodology; it outlines how the Workshop's intended impact and objectives can be tracked and evaluated. 

Development of Indicators
As a component of the logical framework, True Roots International (TRI) developed impact indicators. These indicators are variables that can be measured to determine whether a project achieves its desired outcomes. The indicators are outlined here, organized by type:
OUTPUTS 
Number of individuals trained
Number of networks formed
Number of hours of training completed
OUTCOMES
New knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired
Number of youth leaders participating in collaboration networks 
New collaboration networks formed due to the Workshop
Proficiency in / application of new knowledge, skills, and attitudes
Number of projects strengthened / created because of the Workshop
Number of direct beneficiaries of youth leaders’ projects
2
1
Note: The measurement of certain impact indicators goes beyond the 1-year scope of this M&E study but the processes have built the foundation to measure these indicators on a longer-term basis. 
  • Outputs: The product / service offered at the Workshop (in numbers)
  • Outcomes: The medium-term results of Workshop attendance for participants and their projects or initaitives
  • Longer-term Impact: Deeper changes that result from participants' shift in activities due to their attendance of the Workshop
MONITORING & EVALUATION TIMELINE AND ACTIVITIES
An outline of the evaluation work conducted by True Roots International for the Positive Peace Workshop.
Equip young leaders with tools and skills in peacebuilding and conflict resolution, based on the conceptual framework of Positive Peace.
Facilitate the formation of collaboration networks for participants, forging alliances that are essential to building peace in Mexico.
Motivate young leaders to apply these tools and skills to change their communities, cities, and country through participation in active, peace-related social initiatives.
19
truerootsinternational.org
DEVELOP AND DISTRIBUTE SURVEYS
Based on the above defined indicators and best practice, True Roots International created 4 digital surveys. These surveys (3 participant and 1 facilitator), combined with document review and monitoring of a social media platform, served as data-gathering instruments to measure the impact of the Workshop.
3
Pre-Training Participant Survey (May 2017)
This participant survey was developed to:
The objective of the Pre-Training Participant Survey was to understand the participant population and to generate a baseline from which impact can be measured after the event, and into the future.
Post-Training Participant Survey (June 2017)
The Post-Training Participant Survey was designed to:
Post-Training Facilitator Survey (June 2017)
The Post-Training Facilitator survey was designed to:
Final Participant Survey (December 2017)
The Final Participant Survey aimed to:
SURVEY RESPONSE RATES
Pre-Training Participant Survey: 66%
Post-Training Participant Survey: 48%
Post-Training Facilitator Survey: 100%
Final Participant Survey: 14%
NOTE:
The response rates to the 4 surveys applied generally surpass the average response rate for online surveys (10-15%). The trend of diminishing response rate across 
surveys is normally seen when the same group is surveyed multiple times.
ONGOING ENGAGEMENT WITH PARTICIPANTS
4
  • Collect demographic information
  • Measure participant knowledge, skills, and attitudes pre-training
  • Establish the number of projects participants are working on currently
  • Establish number of collaboration networks that exist and participant level of involvement
  • Measure the level of participant leadership, community engagement, and achievements
  • Measure the quality of workshops, general event sessions, event logistics, and participant learning experience
  • Evaluate participant knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired at training and plans to apply them
  • Assess the Workshop facilitators' experience of the event, particularly the workshop component
  • Gather feedback on event logistics, IEP materials, and support
  • Capture the longer-term impact of the Positive Peace Workshop 
  • Measure: participant application of knowledge, skills, and attitudes post-Workshop
  • Determine the number of projects participants started or strengthened
  • Determine the number of collaboration networks operating
  • Assess levels of participant leadership, community engagement, and achievements
In addition to surveys, TRI has engaged with participants Post-Workshop in the following ways:
  • Meeting with a focus group of participants post-Workshop (in Oaxaca) to discuss the event
  • Posting related articles and information of interest to the Workshop Facebook page
  • Asking participants to share stories of impact post-Workshop via the Workshop Facebook page and email 
  • Asking Rotaract representatives and Rotarians to provide further information on activities / engaged participants
  • Keeping records on engaged participants and their activities
20
truerootsinternational.org
DATA ANALYSIS & REPORTING
Analysis of the data collected from each survey was carried out individually and then comparatively with previous surveys. This ongoing compilation of findings is included in the following reports:  
KEY FINDINGS REPORT
The Key Findings Report summarizes the preliminary findings from the Participant Pre-Training and Participant Post-Training Surveys. TRI outlines participant sociodemographic information, their enhanced understanding of core Workshop concepts, and their feedback on Workshop components and logistics. The report also summarizes suggestions to improve future events based on participant feedback. TRI submitted this report to the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop Coordinator, the Rotary Host Club and District, the Rotary Foundation, and IEP. 
FINAL EVALUATION REPORT
The Final Evaluation Report builds on the foundation of the Key Findings Report to include analysis of data from the Final Participant Survey.  TRI completed a final analysis based on the results of the 3 Participant surveys to assess the extent to which the intended outcomes of the Workshop had been achieved. The report sums up the findings across output, outcome, and longer-term impact indicators as well as detailing a sample of "Impact Stories" from engaged participants. TRI submitted this report to the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop Coordinator, the Rotary Host Club and District, Rotary International Sponsor Clubs and Districts, the Rotary Foundation, and IEP. 
5
WORKSHOP EVALUATION REPORT
EVALUATION BY FACILITATORS
The Intensive Pillars of Positive Peace Workshop Evaluation Report provides detailed feedback on the workshop component of the event, based on findings from the Post-Training Participant Survey. TRI submitted a report on each intensive Workshop to the respective facilitator, as well as to the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop Coordinator.
The Evaluation by Facilitators summarizes the findings of the Post-Training Facilitator survey. TRI summarized feedback from facilitators regarding: the intensive Pillar of Positive Peace Workshop they facilitated, participant engagement, Rotary and IEP support, general Positive Peace Workshop logistics and recommendations for related future activities. TRI submitted this report to the Mexico Positive Peace Workshop Coordinator.
APRIL
2018
SEPT
2017
JUNE
2017
JUNE
2017
21
truerootsinternational.org
22
APPENDIX 2:
INSTITUTIONAL ALLIES
Thank you to the allies and supporters who made this event possible; 
list includes organizations and individuals involved in the National Encounter, May 2017.
Jorge Meruvia
General Coordination
Summer Lewis
Monitoring and Evaluation Coordination
Rotary (Host District y Clubs, Rotary Year 2016-2017)
  • Jorge Luna Carbajal, Rotary District 4185 Governor
  • Sergio Romero Barradas, The Rotary Foundation District Committee President
  • Félix López López, Rotary Club Puebla Centro Histórico President 
  • Jesús Aizpuru Vázquez, Rotary Club Puebla President
The Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP)
  • Michelle Breslauer, Americas Program Director
  • Laura Barrera, Americas Program Coordinator  
  • Patricia de Obeso, IEP Mexico Coordinator 
Academic Supervision, Monitoring and Evaluation, and Support Team
  • Catalina Aguilar Oropeza, Academic Supervisor, Cihuautla A.C. President 
  • Nicola Coakley, True Roots International, Monitoring and Evaluation 
  • Mara Tavernier Morales, Team Leader for Rotaract and Volunteers
  • Design: Adriana Lara
  • Photography: MG-Studios
Workshop Facilitators and Speakers
  • Catalina Aguilar Oropeza, Cihuautla, A.C. President, with co-facilitation by Mónica Quevedo Berrelleza and Karla Téllez Hinojosa
  • Carlos Juárez Cruz, Public Policy and Peacebuilding Consultant, with co-facilitation by Jean Mendieta
  • Wendy Coulson, Peace & Development Education Consulting Founder, with co-facilitation by Jalil Aragón
  • Ismael Couto Benítez, Engineering and Sustainable Development Director, Tec de Monterrey, with co-facilitation by Yuri Angeles
  • Héctor Tello, Outward Bound Mexico Coordinator, with co-facilitation by Carlos Juárez and Omar Ramírez
  • Speakers: Isabel Crowley, Fundación JUCONI; Alona Starostenko, Center for Social Responsibility SUSTENTA; José Adrián Gabriel, Workosfera; Saulo Meis, La Esperanza del Mañana
Institutional Allies
  • Rebecca Crall, Peace and Conflict Prevention/Resolution Area of Focus Manager, Rotary
  • Rotary Districts in Mexico: 4185, 4100, 4110, 4130, 4140, 4170, 4195
  • Rotary Districts in United States and Canada: 5490, 5510, 6060, 6780 (United States); 5010 (United States and Canada); and 5550 (Canada)
  • Rotary Clubs: Puebla Centro Histórico, Puebla (Mexico), Sun City (International Partner), Maryville-Alcoa, Knoxville (United States), y Winnipeg (Canada)
  • Rotaract in Mexico: 4185, 4100, 4110, 4130, 4140, 4170, 4195 
  • Venue: Universidad de las Américas Puebla